killer smiles: a fine line between creepy and beautiful

serial killer smiles - Ted Bundy - Rodney Alcala - compared to James Franco and Willem Dafoe

Pre-serial killer considerations, I simply intended to study what causes people to perceive certain smiles as creepy. From observing trends in art, social media, ranking systems, and pop culture, I identified two main types of “creepy smiles”: Type I, which I coined The Grinch Pinch and Type 2, which I coined The Muted Shark. Types I and II typically contain all or many of the following features:

bias in emotion tracking

AU23 - lip tightener - Facial Action Coding System - FACS

We seem to subscribe to the popular oversimplification that machines are less biased than humans; however, if you are familiar with the ways in which machines are trained to read and focus on different aspects of data, you will know: It's just not that simple. Machines are not free of bias if they are trained by humans.

leveraging facial muscle variation

zygomaticus major dimple

Anatomical variation is a surprisingly ignored consideration for face tracking/facial mocap in tech and entertainment. Simplified anatomy diagrams are often accepted as universally applicable to all faces and few further questions are asked. The reality is: FACIAL MUSCLES ARE HIGHLY VARIABLE.